Limbic Media

Limbic Media

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Five Takeaways from Discover Tectoria 2018

Viatec’s 2018 Discover Tectoria event was a friendly and engaging introduction for Limbic Media’s new marketing team. Having seen Victoria’s vibrant tech sector with fresh eyes, here are our main takeaways from Friday’s exhibition of Victoria’s emerging and established companies.

 

1. Interactivity is king

Nestled in Discover Tectoria’s Creativity Hub, most foot traffic seemed to flock to booths with elements of interactivity. Limbic Media’s Aurora tent invited visitors of all ages into a meditative, darkened space to make music and translate their creativity into a visual experience. Next door, FIRST Robotics BC opened up a floor space for people to engage with robotic vehicles. The most intriguing sound over the event’s wall of voices came from Monkey C Interactive. With little instruction, the interactive Registroid forced people to explore sounds and become their own artist. Also present in the Creativity Hub was Studio Robazzo, helping bring forward the role of technology in art, emphasizing how tech and art are really one and the same. Discover Tectoria succeeds in creating more avenues for audiences of all ages to participate in the creative process.

 

 

 

2. Tech is a kid-centric industry

Even though Discover Tectoria provides ample opportunity to network whether you’re an investor, an existing tech company, or looking for a new career, Discover Tectoria builds on elements of interactivity by involving kids and their role in tech. Outside the Creativity Hub, Discover Tectoria focused on edutainment in The Combustion Chamber by showcasing technologies and experiments for families through presentations and audience involvement, and Engineering for Kids took a more of an industry-specific approach to kick-starting young interest in tech. Discover Tectoria is a venue that recognizes the importance of getting young minds churning early, and highlighting tech that all ages can relate to.

 

3. Victoria’s tech industry is becoming ever more visible 

Discover Tectoria is widening the industry’s audience not only for kids, but for all walks of life. Even just four years ago, the influence of the tech industry in Victoria’s economy wasn’t necessarily all that obvious. Unless you were looking for it, the number of vibrant technology companies gracing downtown office space wasn’t visible—but in a short time, the sector has emerged as the city’s top industry, and events like Discover Tectoria are making that fact widely known to the public. The average tech conference bustles with entrepreneurs, startups, press and VCs. Discover Tectoria stands out by making the public of all ages its primary audience. It encourages people to participate and discover what goes on in our city behind the long-standing face of tourism and government.

4. We need to start thinking of Victoria more as a city and less as a town

Victoria is a tight community, and its tech community is even tighter-this is part of what makes Victoria so appealing. However, it also puts us in danger of staying in a “tourist town” mentality by telling the same old Victorian story over and over. Because of rapid growth in recent years, both in population, real-estate, and industries like tech, Victoria is going through growing pains and developing new identities. We are no longer the flowery city of the newly-wed and nearly dead. Discover Tectoria makes it clear that the tech industry is helping change the face of our narrative, putting us on the map globally as a city on the forefront of technology and culture.

 

5. Victoria’s various sectors need to strengthen their partnerships 

Speaking of tourism and the growth of Victoria’s industries, an audience member posed a pertinent question during the Innovation Theatre talk on Creative Storytelling: What are some examples of how the tech and hospitality industries have collaborated in Victoria?

Although there have been a number of initiatives bridging tech and tourism in Victoria in the last couple years, the ensuing pause said a lot about the visibility of that collaboration, especially between tourism and Victoria’s authentic cultural and arts scene. According to the speakers, Victoria’s various industries often feel like they’re still competing in spite of newly formed partnerships. Discover Tectoria provided a public forum that clearly has open arms to outside industries, given the opportunity to join forces. The overall message was simple: ”Come talk to us. We have lots of ideas and we can make them happen.”

Whether or not last Friday’s exhibition was your first Discover Tectoria, the event had something new for everyone—from toddlers interacting with tech edutainment, to investors checking out emerging local companies, to Limbic’s marketing team getting familiarized with our city’s vibrant tech community. Victoria is a unique climate of rapidly growing industries, and Viatec’s event was an inviting summary of the potential 2018 has to bring for our city’s tech sector.

Creative Marketing in an Attention Economy

Earning Consent: Creative and Ethical Approaches to Marketing in an Attention Economy

Marketing is a necessary tool for getting the word out, but it doesn’t have to be a necessary evil. Earning consent to market to an intended audience, by giving them experiences and content that have real meaning and value in their lives, is not only a more ethical approach than attempting to get attention at any cost, it may prove more effective.

Arguably, time is our most valuable and non-renewable resource. In an economy where advertising is the main source of revenue for information and networking forums – social media, podcasts, magazines and events to name a few – advertisers are vying for ever smaller scraps of our time and attention, and many are willing to use manipulative means to get it (read just about any online marketing blog to learn the latest tips and tricks).

Tristan Harris, the former product philosopher and design ethicist at Google and leader of the non-profit movement Time Well Spent, points out that measuring a site’s value to advertisers by the amount of time user’s spend looking at it does not account for the dissatisfaction and harm caused by countless hours wasted online.

Among the many initiatives Harris is involved with is the development of tools for measuring how well web products align with the goals and aspirations of consumers, and therefore bring real value to people’s lives. While Time Well Spent is aimed at getting designers of big players like Facebook, Twitter and Google to be more ethical, advertisers can also aim to increase their ethical standards, and by doing so they may get ahead of the curve. As a recent Forbes study on the difficulty of marketing to millennials points out, young people are blocking out advertising and going to their networks for recommendations.

They are taking the power back by giving consent to receive advertising from trusted sources, and to earn that consent businesses must consistently provide content and experiences that are both desirable and life-enhancing. For example, Tim Ferriss’ podcast “The Tim Ferriss Show” has generated a huge following by being a reliable source of information and entertainment. Having earned his audience’s consent, he uses his podcast to leverage support and to market his own and other people’s work. This informal advertising is effective because his listeners have chosen to engage and have grown to trust the value of his recommendations.

As the hours spent on smartphones and social media attest, interactivity is effective at getting attention. Interactive technology can exploit this human value in order to benefit advertisers, but, when designed with the intent to enhance people’s lives, it has the potential to be an integral part of an ethical, consent-based, marketing strategy. From language learning sites like Duolingo, to the use of wearable devices to support community building at events, there are numerous examples of how interactive technology can be used to fulfill people’s values and goals. It is through these fulfilling activities that networks and communities of participants become actively engaged and willingly give their consent to learn about the products and services being offered.

Limbic’s Aurora™ lighting system earns attention through interactive experience

A growing arsenal of tools, like ad-blockers and streaming sites, are likely signs we’ve reached peak attention wherein competing for people’s time in an increasingly sparse landscape will not yield more business. Providing experiences, information and products that are not simply desirable, but that satisfy real needs and values can build respectful relationships and earn the consent required to market honestly and effectively to a growing network.

 

New Developments in Sound Reactive Lighting

Welcome to Fall. As the days get darker, things at Limbic Media are lighting up.

Aurora™, our sound reactive lighting system, is getting major attention across North America with holiday installations planned in cities from coast to coast.

innovationtree1Innovation Tree

Last week we unveiled our latest project the Innovation Tree, a testament to Victoria’s high-tech innovative spirit. The Innovation Tree was made possible through a collaboration between the DVBA, the City of Victoria, and VIATEC.

The Innovation Tree is located at the bottom of Government Street near the Empress Hotel. The Innovation Tree is powered by Limbic Media’s sound reactive Aurora™ lighting system. The Aurora™ system controls 1000 LED lights in the tree and responds to the sounds of the City to create intricate and beautiful patterns of light.

At the launch the Innovation Tree came alive to the music of the The Jonnie 5 brass band and even Mayor Lisa Helps was moved to dance in the street alongside the other revelers!

 

 

Sound Reactive Lighting Algorithm Development

On another note, the amazing engineers and lighting designers at Limbic Media have been developing the audio analysis algorithms that drive the Aurora™ product. Here is a video demonstrating its power using our large globe-style fixtures.

Lights are 100% controlled by the music in real-time, no designer needed.

High Density 3D Volumetric LED Display

Recently we have been experimenting with an amazing new 3D LED display.

For the Integrate Art Festival we built an installation using more than over 1000 individually controllable 360 degree LEDs, mapped them into a 3D geometry, and used Aurora™ to analyze and visualize the incoming audio stream live from a DJ (Arya from EMP Productions).

The result is mind blowing…and this is just the beginning 🙂

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