Limbic Media

Limbic Media

Events

The most memorable events are the ones that draw people out of their shells and bring them together in a new way. The byproducts? Interaction and engagement.

Limbic Media looks beyond the traditional methods of prompting conversation and connection to design experiences that surprise and delight. Our unique sensory installations and interactive elements are custom-designed to suit any size of event or special function, from concerts to weddings to just about anything else.

CASE STUDIES OF EVENTS WORK

Social Wearables @ TEDx Victoria 2015

The Concept
At conferences and large events it can be challenging to break people out of their groups to mix and mingle. Meet the concept of Social Wearables – and a new product from Limbic Media, currently in development.

Our first Social Wearables product is a pendant that acts as a large capacitive touch surface surrounded by a ring of multi-coloured lights and capable of haptic feedback in the form of vibration. Each pendant contains a microcontroller and a radio that allows them to communicate with other pendants.

Using the pendants we designed we created a simple game that encourages people to seek out strangers and touch their pendants together, in order to collect all the colours, and cause their own pendants to glow in a beautiful rainbow display.

What We Did
In November 22, 2014, we gave out 50 of our Social Wearables devices to the VIP donor ticket holders at TEDx Victoria. The only information they were given was that the pendants were for a game called “Capture the Rainbow”. The donors were allowed to enter the auditorium to get their seats early.

What Happened Next
What happened next was incredible. Instead of sitting in their seats and texting or checking email on their phones complete strangers started engaging with each other. Soon, the room was filled with the sound of laughter and wonder as the group learned to interact with the devices and each other.

Watch the video above to see for yourself.

Special thanks to MediaNet for the collaboration, and to CreativeBC for funding the project.

Infinity Mirrors @ 2015 VIATeC Awards

The Problem
The VIATeC awards have a reputation for being surprising, ridiculously fun and over-the-top in every way. In previous years there have been 800 person lightsaber fights, industrial grade confetti cannons, swarms of inflatable orcas, and a mobile dance party. So when Dan Gunn, the Director of VIATeC, approached us to come up with something innovative for the awards show we knew we had to come up with something special.

Our Solution
Given the award shows reputation we knew needed to go big and we decided – what is bigger than infinity? We had heard of a light-based optical illusion called an infinity mirror. In an infinity mirror, a set of lights are placed at the edges of a fully reflective mirror, and a second, partially reflective “one-way” mirror, is placed immediately above it. When a person looks into the surface of the partially reflective mirror, the lights appear to recede into infinity, creating the appearance of a tunnel of lights of great depth.

For the award show we knew the stage was going to have a “bar” theme and that there would be 4 large bars on the stage arranged in a semi-circle facing the audience. The bars seemed like a perfect place to mount the infinity mirrors so we decided to build a large infinity mirror to go on the front of each bar. We knew that having 48 square feet of infinite light tunnels on stage was going to be cool – but how could take things to the next level?

The first thing we decided was to put more lights into the mirrors than we had ever seen done before. We managed to find individually addressable RGB LED strips that had an outrageous 144 LEDs per meter. Each mirror had a 5 meter perimeter for a total 720 LEDs. That is a lot of lights but was it enough? Other infinity mirrors we had seen only had a single strip of lights around the perimeter. What would happen if we added more rows? Adding additional rows would allow us to create more complex patterns with the lights. So we added a second and then a third row of LEDs to bring the the total number of lights per mirror to 2160 and the total amount of lights on stage to 8640. Did we mention that each light could be controlled individually and be millions of different colours? To finish the infinity mirrors off we wrote software to map colour and animation from video files to the LEDs in real-time and to make them react to sound.

The Result?
With the infinity mirror effect it was perceptually possible to see tens of thousands of lights simultaneously moving in complex patterns. The overall effect was mesmerizing in a way that bordered on the sublime – like looking at complex patterns in nature such the movement of flames in a fire or waves in the ocean.

The infinity mirrors were the talk of the award show, we helped the VIATeC awards live up to its reputation and we even managed to walk away with an award ourselves! If a picture is worth a thousand words then a video is worth an infinite amount of words. If you want to see what infinity looks like check it out yourself by clicking on the video above.

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