Limbic Media

Limbic Media

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CASC 2018 Conference: LHULH’UTS’UT’EN

Representatives from Canadian science centres and museums came together last week to embody LHULH’UTS’UT’EN—working together—at this year’s Canadian Association of Science Centres‘ 2018 conference. CASC attendees came to Prince George this year to seek inspiration, network, and learn about the challenges facing science centres and museums across the country.

Limbic Media’s Marketing Associate, Deanna Foster, and Lead Design Engineer, Gabrielle Odowichuck, attended the event with an Aurora Jam Tent (check out our Aurora Jam Tent video from Tectoria 2018). Here are a few highlights from their time up north.

Welcome Reception

CASC 2018 Conference

This year’s CASC attendees had a chance to be kids again in the Two Rivers Art Gallery’s Maker Space. Activities ranged from felting, to learning code, to traditional Lheidli T’enneh wood carving. Participants also enjoyed traditional drumming by the talented Khast’an drummers. Check them out for a truly mesmerizing show!

The Way-Late Play Date

CASC 2018 Conference

Clad in their finest plaid, CASC-goers were invited to eat, drink and wield some good ‘ol saws and axes. Logger sports and a relay race kicked off the night, followed by dancing and Northern BC’s finest brews. The Exploration Place provided an interactive setting to network and learn about industry trends and challenges. Highlight of the evening? Chocolate-covered bacon.

The Exhibitors

CASC 2018 Conference

Limbic Media’s Jam Tent, an Aurora-lit enclosure filled with musical instruments, was among a variety of science and museum exhibitors. Little Ray’s Nature Centres (aka. Average-sized Ray’s Nature Centres) provides permanent and traveling hands-on, zoological education exhibits. Sadly, Shane from Little Ray’s was unable to bring a sloth to CASC—but here’s hoping for next year.

Big shoutout to Pathfinders Designs, who was a huge help in Limbic Media’s Jam Tent setup. Pathfinders, based on Vancouver Island, designs and creates wooden science kits.

CASC 2018 Conference

 

CASC 2018 was an exciting reminder of the open-mindedness and innovative thinking of Canada’s industry leaders in science centres and museums. Each attendee left with new connections and inspiring ideas for their home audiences. We had a lot of fun seeing everyone have jam time in our Aurora Jam Tent, and hope to see sound-to-light interactivity infiltrating more science centres and museums across the country in the next year!

CASC 2018 Aurora sound-to-light engine reacting to music

 

Contact us today to plan a Jam Tent for your next event!

Five Takeaways from Discover Tectoria 2018

Viatec’s 2018 Discover Tectoria event was a friendly and engaging introduction for Limbic Media’s new marketing team. Having seen Victoria’s vibrant tech sector with fresh eyes, here are our main takeaways from Friday’s exhibition of Victoria’s emerging and established companies.

 

1. Interactivity is king

Nestled in Discover Tectoria’s Creativity Hub, most foot traffic seemed to flock to booths with elements of interactivity. Limbic Media’s Aurora tent invited visitors of all ages into a meditative, darkened space to make music and translate their creativity into a visual experience. Next door, FIRST Robotics BC opened up a floor space for people to engage with robotic vehicles. The most intriguing sound over the event’s wall of voices came from Monkey C Interactive. With little instruction, the interactive Registroid forced people to explore sounds and become their own artist. Also present in the Creativity Hub was Studio Robazzo, helping bring forward the role of technology in art, emphasizing how tech and art are really one and the same. Discover Tectoria succeeds in creating more avenues for audiences of all ages to participate in the creative process.

 

 

 

2. Tech is a kid-centric industry

Even though Discover Tectoria provides ample opportunity to network whether you’re an investor, an existing tech company, or looking for a new career, Discover Tectoria builds on elements of interactivity by involving kids and their role in tech. Outside the Creativity Hub, Discover Tectoria focused on edutainment in The Combustion Chamber by showcasing technologies and experiments for families through presentations and audience involvement, and Engineering for Kids took a more of an industry-specific approach to kick-starting young interest in tech. Discover Tectoria is a venue that recognizes the importance of getting young minds churning early, and highlighting tech that all ages can relate to.

 

3. Victoria’s tech industry is becoming ever more visible 

Discover Tectoria is widening the industry’s audience not only for kids, but for all walks of life. Even just four years ago, the influence of the tech industry in Victoria’s economy wasn’t necessarily all that obvious. Unless you were looking for it, the number of vibrant technology companies gracing downtown office space wasn’t visible—but in a short time, the sector has emerged as the city’s top industry, and events like Discover Tectoria are making that fact widely known to the public. The average tech conference bustles with entrepreneurs, startups, press and VCs. Discover Tectoria stands out by making the public of all ages its primary audience. It encourages people to participate and discover what goes on in our city behind the long-standing face of tourism and government.

4. We need to start thinking of Victoria more as a city and less as a town

Victoria is a tight community, and its tech community is even tighter-this is part of what makes Victoria so appealing. However, it also puts us in danger of staying in a “tourist town” mentality by telling the same old Victorian story over and over. Because of rapid growth in recent years, both in population, real-estate, and industries like tech, Victoria is going through growing pains and developing new identities. We are no longer the flowery city of the newly-wed and nearly dead. Discover Tectoria makes it clear that the tech industry is helping change the face of our narrative, putting us on the map globally as a city on the forefront of technology and culture.

 

5. Victoria’s various sectors need to strengthen their partnerships 

Speaking of tourism and the growth of Victoria’s industries, an audience member posed a pertinent question during the Innovation Theatre talk on Creative Storytelling: What are some examples of how the tech and hospitality industries have collaborated in Victoria?

Although there have been a number of initiatives bridging tech and tourism in Victoria in the last couple years, the ensuing pause said a lot about the visibility of that collaboration, especially between tourism and Victoria’s authentic cultural and arts scene. According to the speakers, Victoria’s various industries often feel like they’re still competing in spite of newly formed partnerships. Discover Tectoria provided a public forum that clearly has open arms to outside industries, given the opportunity to join forces. The overall message was simple: ”Come talk to us. We have lots of ideas and we can make them happen.”

Whether or not last Friday’s exhibition was your first Discover Tectoria, the event had something new for everyone—from toddlers interacting with tech edutainment, to investors checking out emerging local companies, to Limbic’s marketing team getting familiarized with our city’s vibrant tech community. Victoria is a unique climate of rapidly growing industries, and Viatec’s event was an inviting summary of the potential 2018 has to bring for our city’s tech sector.

New Developments in Sound Reactive Lighting

Welcome to Fall. As the days get darker, things at Limbic Media are lighting up.

Aurora™, our sound reactive lighting system, is getting major attention across North America with holiday installations planned in cities from coast to coast.

innovationtree1Innovation Tree

Last week we unveiled our latest project the Innovation Tree, a testament to Victoria’s high-tech innovative spirit. The Innovation Tree was made possible through a collaboration between the DVBA, the City of Victoria, and VIATEC.

The Innovation Tree is located at the bottom of Government Street near the Empress Hotel. The Innovation Tree is powered by Limbic Media’s sound reactive Aurora™ lighting system. The Aurora™ system controls 1000 LED lights in the tree and responds to the sounds of the City to create intricate and beautiful patterns of light.

At the launch the Innovation Tree came alive to the music of the The Jonnie 5 brass band and even Mayor Lisa Helps was moved to dance in the street alongside the other revelers!

 

 

Sound Reactive Lighting Algorithm Development

On another note, the amazing engineers and lighting designers at Limbic Media have been developing the audio analysis algorithms that drive the Aurora™ product. Here is a video demonstrating its power using our large globe-style fixtures.

Lights are 100% controlled by the music in real-time, no designer needed.

High Density 3D Volumetric LED Display

Recently we have been experimenting with an amazing new 3D LED display.

For the Integrate Art Festival we built an installation using more than over 1000 individually controllable 360 degree LEDs, mapped them into a 3D geometry, and used Aurora™ to analyze and visualize the incoming audio stream live from a DJ (Arya from EMP Productions).

The result is mind blowing…and this is just the beginning 🙂

Urban farming, emergent education, and having really cool friends…

Check it: We’ve been working with Mason Street City Farm and the Pacific School of Innovation and Inquiry.

Since 2013, we’ve had the absolute privilege of working with students from one of Victoria’s coolest high schools- the Pacific School of Innovation and Inquiry; the school is focussed on student-centered learning and emergent curriculum. Awesome. PSII students have been hanging out in our workshop, working with our engineering team on a variety of projects.They recently completed a customize-able doorbell using an arduino. Cool, right? It’s get better. Right now they are working a networked, remote control aquaponics greenhouse system for Mason St Farm. Basically, that means putting fish tanks and greens in a greenhouse together, in a soil-free, mostly closed system that is super efficient and nutrient rich. And what is Mason Street Farm? It’s a super rad urban farm and green space education centre- located right downtown!

We are SO stoked to be working with two such innovative and positive local organizations. Victoria gets increased food security, Mason Street Farm gets a top-end aquaponics system, PSII students get to learn about tech AND farming, and we get to dip our toes in to every little bit of it!

Did I mention that we are stoked? We are. Thanks for being awesome, Victoria.

Audio-reactive LED Butterflies and much more

2014 has been a brilliant year for Limbic Media so far. As of January we moved into a brand new office/lab more than twice the size of the last space and a lot brighter. In the next month we are bringing on a couple new staff including a mechanical engineering coop from UVic.

We have a few interesting art related projects on the go including infinity mirrors for the Victoria Viatech awards on June 20th, a computer vision based 3D tracking/mocap system for audio/video control, and a new social wearables platform funded by CreativeBC.

We were recently approached to imagine and build a unique light based installation for the “Hope for Hannah” benefit concert at Alix Goolden Hall in Victoria, BC. Meet hannah here.

With the creative genius of Limbic’s Gabrielle Odowichuk, a number of large audio-reactive LED butterflies were designed and built. The skeleton of the butterflies were made of soldered wire frame and then covered in white material. The butterflies were them painted by the ridiculously talented Kristin Grant, check out here amazing work.

As for the tech, a whole bunch of addressable RGB LED strips were used to illuminate the butterflies with Limbic’s custom interactive LED control/design software.

This would not have happened without the help of a team of volunteers and the materials and space provided by Cloth Castle.

 

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