Limbic Media

Limbic Media

Author: Manjinder Benning

Interactive Lighting Control is Opening New Doors for LED Applications

This article was written by Limbic Media’s CTO Manjinder Benning and republished with permission from LED Professional Review, an Austrian-based publication for innovators in LED technology.

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Advancements in lighting control technology are allowing for sophisticated interactivity in LED mapping. These new technologies are bridging the gap between lighting control and AI, with the ability to analyze and map data input (such as audio) in real-time. Installations driven by interactive LED control technologies have their place in a variety of application spaces. Manjinder Benning, Founder and CTO of Limbic Media, explains how this new technology works, what its applications are, and what the future of interactive lighting control looks like – not only for end-users, but also for lighting designers and technicians.

Interactivity is a growing feature of consumable technology. Public spaces – from shopping malls to schools, hospitals, and entertainment venues – are increasingly designed with human-centric, interactive approaches. Designers are recognizing the value of interactive technology in driving traffic, educating, healing, and entertaining over platforms that engage and connect people on a multi-sensory level.

This trend has only begun to influence LED applications – and new technologies are making interactive LEDs more sophisticated and accessible than ever before. This article describes the relevance of interactive technology in various industries, the existing state of interactive LED mapping, and outline an autonomous LED mapping technology that expands the current range of interactive LED applications.

 

Interactive stage lightin

 

Interactive technologies are growing in demand

The digital age has allowed anyone to curate information. With limited resources, millions are able to publish content and connect to global networks. People expect a greater level of participation and control over their digital environments. Much of our non-digital experiences remain unchanged despite this shift in digital experience. As a result, many facets of the real world struggle to stay relevant: Retail centres are losing revenue, university enrolments are declining, and community-centred activities are struggling to survive in the Netflix era.

Interactive technologies are becoming more common across spheres of public and private life to stay relevant and increase revenue:

  • Voice-controlled smart hubs are growing in popularity in private residences, creating a common interactive interface for a number of domestic devices.
  • Shopping malls are embracing interactive technologies, such as virtual try-on mirrors, interactive marketing displays, interactive LEDs on building facades (Singapore’s Illuma), virtual immersive experiences, and robotics.
  • Some theatres are testing multi-sensory experiences by manipulating temperatures, scents, and tactile experiences.
  • Education institutions of all levels are introducing more hands-on, interactive learning approaches, such as STEAM.

Implementation of these technologies through public art, entertainment, and education has uncovered many benefits. For participants, multi-sensory input elevates entertainment value, or conversely, calming synesthesia-like effects. It also appeals to various learning styles⁵⁶⁷ in educational settings. Interactive technologies benefit retail-focused spaces by increasing foot traffic and brand loyalty through customer engagement. They also transform under-utilized civic space into social hubs, improving public safety and revitalizing neighbourhoods.

It is clear that interactive, multi-sensory experiences are poised for rapid growth globally. Traditional sectors such as retail, entertainment, and education are struggling to catch up to our world’s digital transformation. These sectors are utilizing interactive technologies to bridge the gap between the digital and physical world. Modern LED technologies play an important but under-utilized role in interactive experiences.

 

Existing interactive LED technologies are limited

LED technologies have been under-utilized in the interactive marketplace for a number of reasons: interactive LED technology has been limited to simplistic sound-to-light interaction – and even in this application, achieving interactions is a laborious and expensive process.

 

Traditional sectors such as retail, entertainment, and education are struggling to catch up to our world’s digital transformation. These sectors are utilizing interactive technologies to bridge the gap between the digital and physical world. Modern LED technologies play an important but under-utilized role in interactive experiences.

 

Until now, interactive LED technology has been largely realized through automatic music-to-light mapping. Driving light fixtures from musical input, known as light organs, was first presented in a 1929 patent: The patent mechanically models light automatically from audio frequencies. A 1989 patent employed electrical resonant circuits to respond to low, medium, and high frequencies. Modern, digital music-to-light mapping systems have a number of advantages over these early systems. Computers can digitally process audio in real-time and extract control signals (energy in certain frequency bins, or tempo, for example) to more meaningfully map lighting schemes.

Some modern lighting control equipment, including hardware and software lighting consoles and VJ software systems, provide designer interfaces to map beat or frequency-based control signals to parameters that modulate lighting. For example, designers can map the amplitude of a 60-100 Hz frequency bin to DMX fixture brightness. This would create a visual “pumping” effect in response to bass.

This paradigm of manually connecting simple control signals – most often derived from the incoming audio signal frequencies—is closely modeled after the original light organ techniques from the 20th century. There has been little innovation in this field since its inception. In addition, mapping light interactions using this method is time-consuming for designers, and as a result, costly for consumers.

 

Potential beyond music-to-light mapping

Beyond music-to-light mapping for LED systems, there is great potential for other interactive data inputs. There has been an explosion, in recent years, for low-cost sensor technologies coupled with easy-to-use micro-controllers such as Raspberry PI. These technologies are capable of sensing data inputs from physical environments more cheaply, accurately, and easily than previously possible.

In terms of LED interactivity and mapping, data inputs could include:

  • Audio
  • Voice recognition
  • Motion detection
  • Data streams (from social media or other live inputs such as weather patterns)

Some commercially-available software products, such as the Isadora system, enable complex input/output system building. This allows designers to map a variety of inputs (such as sensors) to multimedia outputs, such as projections or audio effects. Again, using LEDs as output is largely unexplored.

Although very well designed and capable of dealing with complexity, existing systems still require expert designers to inform mappings between inputs and outputs, and to direct visualizations as inputs change and evolve. No existing technology has been capable of autonomously listening to data input, monitoring output, and learning to make intelligent decisions to map LED visuals over time.

 

Interactive dj lighting

 

This article discusses a new paradigm in interactive LED control: artificially intelligent systems that eliminate the programming expertise, time, and cost required to create advanced interactive LED experiences. Such a system intuitively recognizes distinct input features (from audio or otherwise) in real-time. Input features are mapped according to human-based preferences, without direct human control. This makes interactive LED applications more accessible and less costly to a variety of industries seeking interactive solutions, while elevating user experiences.

 

LED control that maps inputs and drives output autonomously

Imagine an LED installation that intuitively “listens to” audio or other real-time data input and adapts accordingly, learning over time, with no human intervention. This new approach to interactive LED mapping uses an “intelligent” system based on mainly three key elements.

interactive lighting platform

Fig. 1

 

The system is composed of:

  • A temporal correlation unit (110). This acts like a brain, inputting, processing, recording, retrieving, and outputting data. Data inputs can include audio (either from a microphone or line-in audio), motion detection sensor inputs from a camera, data streams (from weather patterns, the stock exchange, tallied votes, or social media, for example), or interfaces that request data input from an audience
  • An oscillator (140). This perturbs the inputs, introducing variation to the LED output. This produces light interactions that are lively, dynamic, and less predictable to the viewer
  • A signal mixer unit (150). This mixes input signals in various ways to create different outputs

The temporal correlation unit references input signals for distinct features, and determines how the oscillator and signal mixer unit behave in response. The system also determines how the output signal spans through a specific color space.

interactive lighting platform

Fig. 2

Figure 3 expands on potential external inputs (120). As with prior technology, the system analyzes binned frequency content (210, 235) and time domain envelopes (215). In addition, the system recognizes and classifies higher-level musical features (220).

Some examples include:

  • Percussion/other specific instruments
  • Vocal qualities
  • Musical genre
  • Key
  • Dissonance and harmony
  • Sentiment
  • Transitions (e.g. from verse to chorus)

The system also interprets nonmusical data inputs (225) in real-time. This includes non-musical audio features, such as speech recognition or environmental sounds (rain, wind, lightning, or footsteps), or the other non-audio data inputs previously described.

Features can be reflected as LED-mapped output in many ways. LED parameters such as motion, color palette, brightness, and decay adapt to reflect specific data input features. This creates LED displays that are more intuitively-mapped to human preferences than previous light-mapping technology. The system’s ability to map intuitively and autonomously in real-time heightens the users’ multi-sensory experience and potential for LED interactivity.

 

Referenced Data Input Determines LED Mapping

An intelligent LED mapping system relies on referenced input signals. The system analyzes new data input for familiar features based on referenced input stored in the temporal correlation unit. Over time, the system optimizes database searches. This allows it to predict input features from audio or other data streams, and create a more intuitive, real-time visual LED output on its own.

The system’s ability to map intuitively and autonomously in real-time heightens the users’ multi-sensory experience and potential for LED interactivity.

When the temporal correlation unit has been adequately trained, it can predict human listeners’ preferences, and map LEDs accordingly for musical, other audio, and non-audio inputs. This system provides a more intuitive, engaging user experience with no need for customized LED programming knowledge or real-time human control:

  • The temporal correlation unit trains itself to map output effectively in three ways:The system acts as a neural network by comparing new data inputs to similar inputs stored in the system’s database. New output features are modeled after those of referenced inputs. This allows the system to quickly reference previous lighting output configurations rather than creating them on the fly.Previous technology requires a technician to manually choose which lighting cues to load and when, whereas this system automatically chooses which cues to load and when. Neural networks can also be supervised. In a supervised neural network, the system recognizes specific data input features that indicate audience approval of the LED mapped output. These input features could include: manual switches, face recognition, or voice recognition that indicate emotional states. This serves to further refine the system’s output choices according to human preferences.

 

  • The system can also utilize evolutionary algorithms. Evolutionary algorithms are used in artificially intelligent systems – they are modeled after selection mechanisms found in evolutionary biology (firefly attraction, ant pheromone trail setting, and bird flocks, for example) to optimize data searches.Evolutionary algorithms, such as a genetic algorithm, allow an LED control system to independently find and select the most effective lighting outputs without human control. As with a supervised neural network, the system governed by genetic algorithms seeks specific audience cues that suggest approval of the mapped LED output. This serves as a fitness function, training the temporal correlation unit to respond to real-time input signals. Third way of the system to train itself

 

  • Similarly to evolutionary algorithms, a system can utilize interacting intelligent agents. Agents also mimic natural patterns in code by responding to specific, predefined rules (e.g. a specific frequency produces a certain color space). Each agent applies a set of rules to generate temporal sequences for LED mappings, again seeking audience cues to train the system how to respond appropriately to input.Agent rules can be parametric. For example, rule parameters are determined by the physical arrangement of LEDs in 2D or 3D installations. A suite of techniques known as nature inspired algorithms, which are modeled after naturally occurring patterns, are a credible source for generative content when considering lighting output. This approach works particularly well with large numbers of LED pixels.

 

Implications of technology for industries and end-users

An intuitive method of mapping LEDs according to human preferences means that multi-sensory, interactive lighting are more immersive and emotive than ever before. An intelligent, autonomous LED control system has many benefits and applications for end-users and various sectors.

Interactive LED lighting at a climbing gym in Victoria, BC

Benefits for end-users:

  • Educational programs can use such systems to leverage multi-sensory, interdisciplinary curriculums that address various learning styles
  • Holiday, architectural, and other lighting companies that already employ LED technologies, can use the system to employ a more interactive, human-centric approach to design
  • Retail centres can use the system’s interactivity, particularly live social media hashtags as data input, to attract customers and leverage brand presence online
  • Cities can incorporate the system in their efforts to revitalize public space by:
    • Investing in interactive, public art using LEDs
    • Visualizing data gathered through smart city initiatives
    • Attracting foot traffic to business areas
    • Improving public safety
    • Place making and creating community focal points
  • Clubs, venues, and AV teams can quickly and effectively create improved visual effects for live performances and DJs
  • Public centres and exhibition venues that adhere to redesign cycles can adapt the system with changing data input types and LED configurations to refresh displays year after year
  • Non-technical users are able to access sophisticated interactive technology without custom programming or design knowledge
  • Users can avoid the time and cost associated with creating and maintaining interactive LED displays
  • LED displays can be controlled and scaled across multiple locations at a lower cost

 

Implications for technicians

It is often assumed that technological advances, particularly using AI, have the potential to destroy jobs. The described system simplifies or removes the programming process, making the technology more accessible and affordable than previous interactive LED technologies – but this does not necessarily imply job obsolescence for lighting designers and technicians. The technology will only change and improve the state of the art in the future, providing a number of benefits for industry professionals.

Benefits for professionals:

  • Provides a sophisticated tool for the lighting designers that can be used in conjunction with existing professional lighting protocols such as DMX
  • Saves lighting designers programming time
  • Allows designers to scale large projects at a lower cost
  • Opens the door to a wider variety of LED applications in industries outside the current status quo
  • Allows designers to manipulate lighting schemes with data input other than music
  • Allows designers to improve or incorporate audience interactivity

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Interactive technologies are poised for global growth, allowing various industries to offer engaging, multi-sensory experiences in non-digital settings. Applying interactivity to LED technologies opens a variety of doors into a number of sectors looking to attract, engage, and educate communities in settings that struggle to stay relevant in our digital world.

Until recent advancements in LED control technology, mapping data input to lighting design has been limited to audio input using age-old light organ techniques. While low-cost and easy to use micro-controllers such as Raspberry PI have opened new doors in LED mapping, the process still requires skilled lighting designers and programmers. The cost and time associated with creating and maintaining interactive LED displays using these methods has made interactive LED applications costly and inaccessible to a variety of industries and audiences.

interactive public art

A new technology, outlined in “System and Method for Predictive Generation of Visual Sequences,” addresses these barriers to new LED applications by controlling LED interactivity autonomously yet elegantly. The system analyzes data input, including music, non-musical audio, and non-audio data streams for distinct input features. Input features are mapped into distinct LED output parameters based on human preferences, and indexed into the system’s database. This indexing allows the system to autonomously predict upcoming data input and intelligently refine its output over time.

The system’s design avoids the need for timely human programming and maintenance, creates LED mapping that looks aesthetically detailed and intuitive, and allows real-time interaction from a variety of data inputs. This has clear benefits to the LED lighting industry: it opens doors to new applications in various sectors seeking interactive solutions for consumers. It creates heightened multi-sensory, end-user experiences. It offers a sophisticated tool for lighting technicians and professional designers.

 

References:

[5] Johnson, Gretchen L., and Edelson, Jill R.. “Integrating Music and Mathematics in the Elementary Classroom.” Teaching Children Mathematics, Vol. 9, No. 8, April 2003, pp. 474-479.
[6] Wilmes, Barbara, Harrington, Lauren, Kohler-Evans, Patty, and Sumpter, David. “Coming to Our Senses: Incorporating Brain Research Findings into Classroom Instruction.” Education, Vol. 128, No. 4, Summer 2008, pp. 659-666.
[7] Kast, Monika, Baschera, Gian-Marco, Gross, Markus, Jäncke, Lutz & Meyer, Martin. “Computer-based learning of spelling skills in children with and without dyslexia.” Annals of Dyslexia, 12 May, 2011, DOI: 10.1007/s11881-011-0052-2

Press Release: Limbic Media forms strategic partnership with Texas based Lumyn

 

 

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Limbic Media and Lumyn Immersive Media announce a strategic partnership to deliver the world’s first interactive AI-based lighting platform.

 Aurora

“The easiest to use and most sophisticated sound reactive lighting product in the market”

“Aurora’s capabilities for expansion are limitless, from sound reactive to sensors to online data via APIs”

“We are very excited to share this game changing technology with the world. This Strategic partnership with Lumyn will help launch Aurora out into the wild. We have tremendous trust and respect for Lumyn’s CEO, Darren Vader” — Justin Love, President, Limbic Media

Victoria, BC & Dallas, TX— July 14th, 2017- Limbic Media and Lumyn Immersive Media are excited to announce a new strategic partnership that will launch the world’s most advanced sound reactive lighting system, Aurora, for the upcoming holiday season into the United States. Both companies are enthusiastic about the opportunity to impact the public through an immersive, personal experience using patented audio analysis algorithms to unravel sound in ways that no human being or lighting designer can. Audio information is analyzed in real-time to extract features as input into an AI based lighting engine.

Many customers have already benefited from using Aurora to help increase their brand exposure, attract attention to their event and expand their reach via social media. Aurora provides a “wow” factor at events, drives traffic and grabs attention at prime locations, delights children during the holidays, and so much more.

The hardware team was asked to create a platform that would not limit the creativity and vision of our designers and clients. Aurora is a beast of a system with a huge amount of raw processing power and expandability.  While I personally find the specs impressive, they are merely in service to the complex software that makes possible the incredible interactions Aurora has with the public.” — Simon Pearson, Senior Hardware Engineer, Limbic Media

“In my decades of experience in the lighting industry, this is the most exciting product that I have ever seen.  I am impressed with the creativity and knowledge of the team at Limbic Media and I am thrilled to be partnering with them” — Darren Vader, CEO, Lumyn Immersive Media

For more information on Aurora, please visit:
www.lumyn.art
www.limbicmedia.com/products/aurora

 

About Limbic Media
Limbic Media creates high-tech, engaging experiences at the intersection of art and technology. Our team of artists, computer scientists, and engineers have a passion for building products that inspire people to re-imagine their connection to each other and to their environments. We are passionate about technologies that invite you to engage, collaborate and play.

“We use art and technology to enhance the exploration and experience of the human condition” — Justin Love, President, Limbic Media.

About Lumyn Immersive Media
Lumyn Immersive Media is based in Dallas, Texas and offers design, consulting, rental and sales of immersive lighting experiences, technology based sound and light systems, displays, shows, and art pieces for events throughout the United States.

Address:

Limbic Media
#2 740 Discovery Street
Victoria, BC
V8T 1H2
778.430.5132

Lumyn Immersive Media
3368 Garden Brook Drive
Dallas, Texas

Adding Light to The World’s Largest Instrument

Back in 2015, Music By The Sea and Limbic Media premiered the first version of “The World’s Largest Instrument” at the Music By The Sea Festival in Bamfield, BC.

In preparation for another performance on Canada Day 2017 in Port Alberni, to celebrate 150, we have started working on adding high power RGB LED panels to each horn.

Initial wiring of custom LED panel

A high power grid of LED’s custom made by Limbic Media will be connected to each remote horn. When a keyboard note is played from the shore then the respective horn will sound and the LED array will light up. Each horn lights up with a different colour.

Simon lit up and ready to go to sea

We took the test panel out to sea in a row boat and it looked really cool! The light from the panel created a beautiful reflection all the way to the beach.

Testing of the LED array out at sea ~200m.

Creative Marketing in an Attention Economy

Earning Consent: Creative and Ethical Approaches to Marketing in an Attention Economy

Marketing is a necessary tool for getting the word out, but it doesn’t have to be a necessary evil. Earning consent to market to an intended audience, by giving them experiences and content that have real meaning and value in their lives, is not only a more ethical approach than attempting to get attention at any cost, it may prove more effective.

Arguably, time is our most valuable and non-renewable resource. In an economy where advertising is the main source of revenue for information and networking forums – social media, podcasts, magazines and events to name a few – advertisers are vying for ever smaller scraps of our time and attention, and many are willing to use manipulative means to get it (read just about any online marketing blog to learn the latest tips and tricks).

Tristan Harris, the former product philosopher and design ethicist at Google and leader of the non-profit movement Time Well Spent, points out that measuring a site’s value to advertisers by the amount of time user’s spend looking at it does not account for the dissatisfaction and harm caused by countless hours wasted online.

Among the many initiatives Harris is involved with is the development of tools for measuring how well web products align with the goals and aspirations of consumers, and therefore bring real value to people’s lives. While Time Well Spent is aimed at getting designers of big players like Facebook, Twitter and Google to be more ethical, advertisers can also aim to increase their ethical standards, and by doing so they may get ahead of the curve. As a recent Forbes study on the difficulty of marketing to millennials points out, young people are blocking out advertising and going to their networks for recommendations.

They are taking the power back by giving consent to receive advertising from trusted sources, and to earn that consent businesses must consistently provide content and experiences that are both desirable and life-enhancing. For example, Tim Ferriss’ podcast “The Tim Ferriss Show” has generated a huge following by being a reliable source of information and entertainment. Having earned his audience’s consent, he uses his podcast to leverage support and to market his own and other people’s work. This informal advertising is effective because his listeners have chosen to engage and have grown to trust the value of his recommendations.

As the hours spent on smartphones and social media attest, interactivity is effective at getting attention. Interactive technology can exploit this human value in order to benefit advertisers, but, when designed with the intent to enhance people’s lives, it has the potential to be an integral part of an ethical, consent-based, marketing strategy. From language learning sites like Duolingo, to the use of wearable devices to support community building at events, there are numerous examples of how interactive technology can be used to fulfill people’s values and goals. It is through these fulfilling activities that networks and communities of participants become actively engaged and willingly give their consent to learn about the products and services being offered.

Limbic’s Aurora™ lighting system earns attention through interactive experience

A growing arsenal of tools, like ad-blockers and streaming sites, are likely signs we’ve reached peak attention wherein competing for people’s time in an increasingly sparse landscape will not yield more business. Providing experiences, information and products that are not simply desirable, but that satisfy real needs and values can build respectful relationships and earn the consent required to market honestly and effectively to a growing network.

 

New Developments in Sound Reactive Lighting

Welcome to Fall. As the days get darker, things at Limbic Media are lighting up.

Aurora™, our sound reactive lighting system, is getting major attention across North America with holiday installations planned in cities from coast to coast.

innovationtree1Innovation Tree

Last week we unveiled our latest project the Innovation Tree, a testament to Victoria’s high-tech innovative spirit. The Innovation Tree was made possible through a collaboration between the DVBA, the City of Victoria, and VIATEC.

The Innovation Tree is located at the bottom of Government Street near the Empress Hotel. The Innovation Tree is powered by Limbic Media’s sound reactive Aurora™ lighting system. The Aurora™ system controls 1000 LED lights in the tree and responds to the sounds of the City to create intricate and beautiful patterns of light.

At the launch the Innovation Tree came alive to the music of the The Jonnie 5 brass band and even Mayor Lisa Helps was moved to dance in the street alongside the other revelers!

 

 

Sound Reactive Lighting Algorithm Development

On another note, the amazing engineers and lighting designers at Limbic Media have been developing the audio analysis algorithms that drive the Aurora™ product. Here is a video demonstrating its power using our large globe-style fixtures.

Lights are 100% controlled by the music in real-time, no designer needed.

High Density 3D Volumetric LED Display

Recently we have been experimenting with an amazing new 3D LED display.

For the Integrate Art Festival we built an installation using more than over 1000 individually controllable 360 degree LEDs, mapped them into a 3D geometry, and used Aurora™ to analyze and visualize the incoming audio stream live from a DJ (Arya from EMP Productions).

The result is mind blowing…and this is just the beginning 🙂

The World’s Largest Musical Instrument

Over the last year we had the pleasure of starting work on a very interesting and totally ridiculous project. We were tasked with building “The Worlds Largest Musical Instrument”. Sounds cool right?

So basically it is a wirelessly controlled system where a piano keyboard sends its note data to a set of, very loud, distributed air horns. Each air horn is connected to a compressed air scuba tank and is totally standalone, meaning it has its own battery, and wireless receiver and can be placed up 10 km from the location of the keyboard. So far we have built 12 of these horns, tuned specifically to the notes on a piano keyboard such that Oh Canada and God Save The Queen can be played with the system.

hornsbeaconhill-1024x768

The system was installed and performed during the Music By The Sea music festival this summer out on 12 boats in the Bamfield Inlet, near the Bamfield Marine Sciences Centre. Big thanks to the local community of Bamfield for donating their time and boats to make this crazy experiment happen!

However, this is only phase 1. Over the next 2 years we plan to take this project international.  On Canada Day 2017 (Canada’s 150th celebration) Oh Canada will be performed from Bamfield, Canada. The notes from the performance will be transmitted in real-time over the internet, not only to sets of boat horns all over Canada, but around the world! At which point it will be “The Worlds Largest Instrument”

 

 

 

This insane idea/concept and funding for the project was brought to us by the Music By The Sea music festival and the Director our good friend, genius composer and inventor Chris Donison. Watch The Ted talk at TedX Victoria 2015, to hear about the project in his own words.

If you enjoyed that…

please also check out this short documentary chronicling the project so far and describing the overall vision. Big thanks to Cedarwood Productions for making the film.

Massive Voice Controlled LED Walls + More

Busy times at Limbic Media these days. We have worked on a number of creative and amazing projects over the last few months: A distributed remote controlled air horn instrument (blog post coming soon, we promise), a computer vision/inertial measurement based performance tracking system which will debut at Victoria’s first Circus Festival next April 2-3. Check out our guest blog post, we threw a killer art show “Lux Voluptus II” featuring some incredible digital artists (blog post also coming soon), and we had the pleasure of working with the amazing talented group at HFour from Vancouver to realize 2 massive voice controlled LED walls for the Escapade Music Festival and Heineken in Ottawa.

The response was wicked, we continue to learn that people want to interact, they want to play and participate, they want to meet and connect with each other, they just need an excuse to do it. Art is that excuse.

Check out HFour’s portfolio, pretty impressive. Here are some images of the LED walls:

20150628-heineken-113-1024x681

WINNERS! Limbic Media at the 2014 VIATeC Awards

Limbic Media is a transdisciplinary team of artist-engineers with a passion for technology and the arts. Limbic Media was awarded “Member of the Year” at the coveted 2014 VIATeC Technology Awards Gala. Chosen as a leading community supporter and collaborator celebrating innovation and excellence in the Greater Victoria’s advanced technology sector.

Limbic represents the nexus of technology, art, and entrepreneurship that we think best represents Tectoria today and our community in the future.” -Thompson, Nevin. Limbic Media: Tectorian of the Week. Web. 11 June 2014

Thank you Constanze Link for compiling this footage to celebrate our VIATeC “Member of the Year” award, and for capturing Chris Gat’s show stealing moves!

Audio-reactive LED Butterflies and much more

2014 has been a brilliant year for Limbic Media so far. As of January we moved into a brand new office/lab more than twice the size of the last space and a lot brighter. In the next month we are bringing on a couple new staff including a mechanical engineering coop from UVic.

We have a few interesting art related projects on the go including infinity mirrors for the Victoria Viatech awards on June 20th, a computer vision based 3D tracking/mocap system for audio/video control, and a new social wearables platform funded by CreativeBC.

We were recently approached to imagine and build a unique light based installation for the “Hope for Hannah” benefit concert at Alix Goolden Hall in Victoria, BC. Meet hannah here.

With the creative genius of Limbic’s Gabrielle Odowichuk, a number of large audio-reactive LED butterflies were designed and built. The skeleton of the butterflies were made of soldered wire frame and then covered in white material. The butterflies were them painted by the ridiculously talented Kristin Grant, check out here amazing work.

As for the tech, a whole bunch of addressable RGB LED strips were used to illuminate the butterflies with Limbic’s custom interactive LED control/design software.

This would not have happened without the help of a team of volunteers and the materials and space provided by Cloth Castle.

 

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